CBP’s Section 301 Enforcement Push

Dear Friends,

As companies consider mitigation strategies to offset the impact of the Section 301 duties, we wanted to share an important update regarding enforcement priorities at the border.  Further to recent reports, CBP’s Office of Regulatory Audit has confirmed that it will be ramping up enforcement of “various types” of imported electronics (i.e., products classified in chapters 84 and 85 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States).  In connection with these efforts, Regulatory Audit is adding staff, including managers and auditors.  For instance, CBP is adding 60 new auditors across Regulatory Audit’s 10 field offices.  Our contacts in Regulatory Audit have informed us that, as part of this effort, a first “wave” of CF-28s (Requests for Information) since the imposition of the Section 301 duties will be issued in 2-4 weeks.  

There are several reasons for CBP to focus its enforcement on imported electronics.  Most importantly, billions of dollars in revenue are at stake for the U.S. government, and CBP is intent on collecting that revenue (the Trump administration expects CBP to collect “record-setting revenues”).  Also, given that electronics have generally been entitled to be entered duty free (or subject to very low duty rates), CBP recognizes that importers are under pressure to reduce the Section 301 impact and, therefore, may (intentionally or unintentionally) act in a manner contrary to U.S. customs laws and regulations.  Last, targeting electronics is justifiable given the conclusions of the Section 301 investigation, namely that the Government of China engages in intellectual property theft and forced technology transfers to support its industrial advancement goals.  Stated differently, targeting electronics aligns with the legal basis for the Section 301 duties and the administration’s messaging around China’s unfair policies. 

While CBP has confirmed that an enforcement push will be made with respect to electronics, we understand that CBP is increasing enforcement activities on all fronts.  As such, companies pursuing Section 301 mitigation strategies should tread cautiously.  Re-classifying products, changing the country of origin, and/or decreasing the customs valuation (for example, by declaring the “first sale” price in a multi-tiered transaction, rather than the price the U.S. importer pays), is likely to draw scrutiny from CBP.  As such, it is important that companies be able to demonstrate that they exercised reasonable care in carrying out these activities (not exercising reasonable care can lead to steep penalties, in addition to owing unpaid duties).  To demonstrate that a company is exercising reasonable care, we recommend having on file contemporaneously drafted documentation that substantiates the legal basis for any changes (e.g., documentation explaining that, based on changes to the supply chain, the product is no longer Chinese origin, since it is now last substantially transformed origin somewhere else).  Further, any company that receives a CF-28 or CF-29 (Notice of Action) should escalate the matter to the company’s legal department before responding and/or engage outside trade counsel, if appropriate. 

We hope this is helpful.  If you have any questions regarding the above, please let us know.    

Best regards,

Ted

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