Section 301 – China Responds

Dear Friends,

As expected, China announced yesterday that it will implement retaliatory tariffs of either 10% or 5% on $60 billion worth of U.S. products imported into China beginning September 24, 2018.  China’s action is in response to the U.S. announcement of its intention to implement the Section 301 List 3 tariffs.

The latest round of Chinese retaliatory tariffs will apply to products of U.S. origin that fall on four lists that China published on August 3, 2018.  China organized these four lists according to proposed tariff rates of 25%, 20%, 10% and 5%.  Based on its latest announcement, while the products have not changed, the tariff rates have.  China will impose a 10% retaliatory tariff on U.S. products on the 25% and 20% lists, and it will impose a 5% tariff on products on the latter two lists.  Links to these four lists are provided for your reference below.  While the lists are in Chinese, the products can be identified by their tariff numbers. 

U.S. Products to be Subject to 10% Tariff:

U.S. Products to be Subject to 5% Tariff:

Unlike the United States, China does not offer a formal process for importers to request product exclusions from the tariffs, and affected companies must explore other options to mitigate the impact of the Chinese retaliatory tariffs on their businesses, such as advocacy, changes to their sourcing and manufacturing strategies, and other duty planning methods.

Our trade team in China routinely assists companies evaluate their options and implement mitigation strategies to address the tariffs.  If you have questions, or if you would like to explore possible options, you can either contact us or reach out to Jon Cowley (jon.cowley@bakermckenzie.com) or Frank Pan (frank.pan@bakermckenzie.com) directly.  

We hope this update is helpful.

Best regards,
Ted

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Re: Section 301 — The U.S. Imposes Additional Duties on ~$200 Billion Worth of Chinese-Origin Imports

Further to the below, the USTR has now released the finalized List 3.  The USTR’s website provides as follows:

“The list contains 5,745 full or partial lines of the original 6,031 tariff lines that were on a proposed list of Chinese imports announced on July 10, 2018.  Changes to the proposed list were made after USTR and the interagency Section 301 Committee sought and received comments over a six-week period and testimony during a six-day public hearing in August.  USTR engaged in a thorough process to rigorously examine the comments and testimony and, as a result, determined to fully or partially remove 297 tariff lines from the original proposed list.  Included among the products removed from the proposed list are certain consumer electronics products such as smart watches and Bluetooth devices; certain chemical inputs for manufactured goods, textiles and agriculture; certain health and safety products such as bicycle helmets, and child safety furniture such as car seats and playpens.”

A copy of the complete list is attached here for your reference: Tariff List_09.17.18  It will also be published in the Federal Register later this week. 

Best regards,

Ted


Dear Friends,

President Trump announced today that the United States would be moving ahead to impose additional duties on a further $200 billion worth of Chinese-origin imports (referred to as ’List 3’).  According to the announcement, the additional duties will start at 10% and run through the end of the year.  If the matter has not been resolved satisfactorily by then, the rate will be increased to 25% on January 1, 2019.  The additional duties will become effective next Monday, September 24, 2018.  A copy of the Statement from the President is attached for your reference:

The additional duties will apply to Chinese-origin goods classified in the tariff subheadings included on the final list.  This list has not been published yet, but, given the effective date (a week from now), it is expected in the next day or two.  The Section 301 Committee has been considering the comments and testimony received on the list of 6,031 tariff subheadings originally proposed for List 3.  It is being reported that a relatively small number of tariff subheadings (a few hundred) are being removed from the final list as a result of this process.

Once the final List 3 is published, it is widely expected that China will retaliate by imposing additional duties on a list of U.S.-origin products worth approximately $60 billion.  It is also being reported that China may decline any invitation issued by the United States to begin negotiations until after the midterm elections and/or may engage other levers domestically to squeeze U.S. companies doing business in China.

If China does retaliate, the President’s statement says that the Administration “will immediately pursue phase three, which is tariffs on approximately $267 billion of additional imports.”  This would be List 4 and it would cover all of the remaining imports from China.

This is the latest (and undoubtedly not the last) salvo in the on-going trade war between the United States and China.  Unfortunately, it is hard to view this salvo as being effective.  Rather than force the parties to the table, an additional 10% duty is arguably offset by the declining value of the yuan (which is down high single-digit percentages in a year) and is likely going to be viewed as a sign of wavering resolve from a president in a contentious midterm election year.  In short, today’s announcement will likely prolong the trade war, rather than help bring it to a speedy conclusion (which, in all fairness, may be the plan after all – if the war drags on long enough, companies will start to leave the war zone . . .).

We hope this is helpful.  If you have any questions about the Section 301 duties (or China’s retaliation), please let us know.

Best regards,

Ted

Section 301 — The U.S. Imposes Additional Duties on ~$200 Billion Worth of Chinese-Origin Imports

Dear Friends,

President Trump announced today that the United States would be moving ahead to impose additional duties on a further $200 billion worth of Chinese-origin imports (referred to as ’List 3’).  According to the announcement, the additional duties will start at 10% and run through the end of the year.  If the matter has not been resolved satisfactorily by then, the rate will be increased to 25% on January 1, 2019.  The additional duties will become effective next Monday, September 24, 2018.  A copy of the Statement from the President is attached for your reference: 

The additional duties will apply to Chinese-origin goods classified in the tariff subheadings included on the final list.  This list has not been published yet, but, given the effective date (a week from now), it is expected in the next day or two.  The Section 301 Committee has been considering the comments and testimony received on the list of 6,031 tariff subheadings originally proposed for List 3.  It is being reported that a relatively small number of tariff subheadings (a few hundred) are being removed from the final list as a result of this process.

Once the final List 3 is published, it is widely expected that China will retaliate by imposing additional duties on a list of U.S.-origin products worth approximately $60 billion.  It is also being reported that China may decline any invitation issued by the United States to begin negotiations until after the midterm elections and/or may engage other levers domestically to squeeze U.S. companies doing business in China.

If China does retaliate, the President’s statement says that the Administration “will immediately pursue phase three, which is tariffs on approximately $267 billion of additional imports.”  This would be List 4 and it would cover all of the remaining imports from China.

This is the latest (and undoubtedly not the last) salvo in the on-going trade war between the United States and China.  Unfortunately, it is hard to view this salvo as being effective.  Rather than force the parties to the table, an additional 10% duty is arguably offset by the declining value of the yuan (which is down high single-digit percentages in a year) and is likely going to be viewed as a sign of wavering resolve from a president in a contentious midterm election year.  In short, today’s announcement will likely prolong the trade war, rather than help bring it to a speedy conclusion (which, in all fairness, may be the plan after all – if the war drags on long enough, companies will start to leave the war zone . . .).

We hope this is helpful.  If you have any questions about the Section 301 duties (or China’s retaliation), please let us know.

Best regards,

Ted

Miscellaneous Tariff Bill — One Step Closer to Reality

Dear Friends,

In a bit of good trade news, late last week, the Senate passed a slightly modified version of the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Act of 2018 that had passed the House back in January 2018.  The bill authorizes temporary duty suspensions or reductions for hundreds products (the duty suspensions/reductions are generally effective for 2 years).  The bill also contains a provision extending certain customs user fees. 

The Senate version strikes a small number of products included in the House version, and modifies a handful of others.  As a result, the two versions of the bill will now need to be reconciled (given the small number of changes made by the Senate, the House will likely just vote on/pass the Senate version).  If this occurs, then it appears that the MTB will be sent to the President for signature as a stand-alone bill (rather than waiting to include it as part of a larger trade bill).  Given the concerns some in Congress have raised regarding the President’s recent trade policies – e.g., the handling of the ZTE enforcement case, the processing of Section 232 product exclusion petitions, etc., MTB’s best shot is probably as a stand-alone bill, rather than waiting to be included as part of a larger trade bill, as has been done traditionally.  It will also be interesting to see whether the President is inclined to sign such a bill.  While MTB is generally viewed as providing a limited benefit to U.S. manufacturers (the MTB’s intent is to provide a tariff break to manufacturing inputs that are not available domestically), the President has indicated in the past that MTB primarily benefits Chinese exporters.   

It is important to note that the MTB, if enacted, only impacts the Column 1, General rates of duty for covered articles (i.e., the Most Favored Nation/Normal Trade Relations rates).  The MTB does not change or otherwise impact Section 232 or Section 301 duties; those still apply.

All companies should review the list of products included in the MTB.  The provisions are not (supposed to be) company-specific.  Stated differently, any company that imports an article covered by a MTB description can claim the duty benefit (even if you were not the proponent of the provision).  Also, it is worth mentioning that the process of requesting MTB benefits will re-open in about a year (by October 15, 2019), so it is not too early to start preparing to participate in that process.

We hope this is helpful.  We helped numerous companies get their articles included in the MTB and would be happy to discuss this with you further.  If you have any questions, please let us know.

Best regards,
Ted

A Possible Armistice in the U.S.-EU Trade War

Dear Friends,

Just a short note to let you know that an armistice may be in the works in the U.S.-EU trade war.

President Trump met with European Commission President Juncker at the White House today.  Following the meeting, the two each gave short statements to the media assembled in the Rose Garden. 

President Trump started by saying that the United States and EU were entering a “new phase” in their $1 billion bilateral trade relationship.  He went on to state that the two sides “agreed today . . .to work together towards zero tariffs, zero non-tariff barriers and zero subsidies on non-auto industrial goods.”  He also mentioned that the EU had agreed to buy “a lot of soybeans” and to start importing more liquefied natural gas (the EU will be a “massive buyer of LNG”).  The two sides also agreed to start a dialogue on standards to help ease trade/reduce barriers and to work together to reform the WTO and combat unfair trade practices by other countries (read:  China).  He concluded by saying that these negotiations will start “now” and that the two sides will resolve both the U.S. steel and aluminum duties, as well as the EU retaliatory duties.

President Juncker gave a shorter statement that (largely) corroborated what President Trump said.  The two sides would negotiate a zero tariff agreement on industrial goods, cooperate more on energy and agriculture, begin a dialogue on standards and work together to reform the WTO.  He also said there was agreement that, as long as the parties are negotiating, no further tariffs would be imposed and existing tariffs would be reassessed.

This is a positive development.  That said, the devil is always in the details.  For example, it is not yet clear whether the United States will lift the 232 duties on steel and aluminum for EU origin products immediately, or only once an agreement is formally reached, etc.  Stay tuned for more.  In the meantime, if you have any questions, please let us know.

Best regards,
Ted

EU Retaliatory Tariffs – Enter into Force Today

Dear Friends,

As you may have heard, the EU has formally decided to impose retaliatory tariffs on certain products originating in the United States.  This is in response to President Trump’s decision to impose additional tariffs on EU steel and aluminium products.

The new additional tariffs will come into effect today, June 22nd.

List of affected items

The full list of affected EU tariff codes is set out in Annex I to Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2018/886, available here.  In almost all cases, products are subject to an additional duty of 25%.

The new tariffs affect all goods of US origin falling within the affected tariff codes that are imported into the EU from June 22nd, except for:

  • goods already exported from the US before 22 June (for which the importer must provide proof); and
  • goods for which an import licence exempting or reducing duty on the goods (e.g., by use of tariff quotas) has been obtained before 22 June.

As a result, if your goods have been shipped out of the US prior to the 22nd of June or if they are currently “on the water” or if  they are held under bond in the EU prior to the 22nd of June, they will not be affected by the additional tariffs.

The legislation also provides for additional tariffs on other product lines, which will take effect from the earlier of (i) 1 June 2021 or (ii) from the fifth day following a WTO ruling that the US is in violation of the WTO Agreement.  These products and tariff rates are listed in Annex II to the Regulation linked above.

Recommended actions

We suggest that you:

  • review the tariff codes for any products imported into the EU and identify those caught by these measures;
  • verify that none of those would qualify as “originating in the US”. We note that products that are manufactured in another country but have a high US content may qualify as ‘US-origin’ goods if the local manufacturing  / processing is not sufficient to confer origin. You should therefore carefully review the origin of products caught by the additional duties that have US content.

 

The situation remains fast-moving, and we note in particular recent news reports that suggest that the EU may offer to reduce its tariffs on automobile imports in exchange for relief from the new US measures.  If the US agrees, then the EU will drop its retaliatory measures.

Please do let us know if you have any questions on the new measures, or if we can assist in any way.

Best regards,

Ted

Section 301 – China’s Response

Dear Friends,

As expected, China has responded to today’s U.S. announcement with one of its own. 

 

China’s announcement mirrors the position adopted by the United States.  China will impose an additional 25% customs duty on approximately $34 billion worth of imports from the United States, as of July 6, 2018.  This list includes various agricultural products, certain food/juice/beverages, automobiles, auto parts, etc.  China is also considering imposing a 25% customs duty on a second list of U.S. products worth approximately $16 billion.  Both lists are attached here (although in Chinese, the tariff classifications are provided). 

This is the latest, but undoubtedly not the last, round in this dispute.  We expect that the U.S. administration will issue a response (likely in a tweet, at least initially) over the weekend (if not sooner).  A few months back, when China threatened to retaliate for any U.S. duties imposed under section 301, President Trump said he would up the ante by imposing a 25% customs duty on an additional $100 billion worth of imports from China.  We may now get to see if he is willing to make good on that threat.

Best regards,
Ted