3/8/17 Update: Section 232 Duties on Steel & Aluminum – Part IV

Dear Friends,

Further to the below, President Trump signed two Presidential Proclamations today – one on steel imports and one on aluminum imports (available here and here).  As expected, the President is imposing an additional 25% duty on steel, and an additional 10% duty on aluminum, imported from all countries except Canada and Mexico beginning on March 23, 2018.  The details are as follows:

Steel Duties

* the 25% additional duty will apply to “steel articles” imported from all countries except Canada and Mexico as of March 23, 2018; 

* “steel articles” are defined by reference to Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) 6-digit subheading, as follows:  “7206.10 through 7216.50, 7216.99 through 7301.10, 7302.10, 7302.40 through 7302.90, and 7304.10 through 7306.90, including any subsequent revisions to these HTS classifications”;

* the 25% additional duty will apply to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, as of March 23, 2018;

* imports from Canada and Mexico are exempted from the additional duty for now; the proclamation describes the special relationship the United States has with these countries and concludes that steel imports from these countries should be exempted, but qualifies it by saying “at least at this time”; this exemption is likely tied progress with the on-going NAFTA renegotiations and could be taken away by the President with little notice; also, it seems clear that the President means to exempt articles produced in Canada or Mexico, not just articles imported from Canada or Mexico (you cannot ship steel produced in China through Canada and avoid the additional U.S. duty);

* imports from countries with which the United States has “a security relationship” (e.g., allies, like the EU, Australia, Japan, Korea, etc.) are encouraged to discuss with the Administration “alternative ways to address the threatened impairment of the national security” presented by imports from their country; this could possibly lead to a series a ‘voluntary-restraint-type’ arrangements being negotiated where exporting countries agree to limit exports to certain levels; 

* there will be a petition-based, product exclusion process run by the Department of Commerce (with input from other agencies); the standard for exclusion will be whether the article is (i) produced in the United States “in a sufficient and reasonably available amount or of a satisfactory quality” or (ii) subject to specific national security considerations; petitions need to be filed by “a directly affected party located in the United States” (i.e., foreign suppliers need not apply); Commerce will issue formal procedures for this process by March 18th;

* the duties will remain in effect until “expressly reduced, modified, or terminated”;

* Commerce will continue to monitor the situation with regard to imports and their impact on the national security and recommend further actions to the President, as needed.

Aluminum Duties

* the 10% additional duty will apply to “aluminum articles” imported from all countries except Canada and Mexico as of March 23, 2018;

* “aluminum articles” are defined by reference to Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) classification, as follows:  “(a) unwrought aluminum (HTS 7601); (b) aluminum bars, rods, and profiles (HTS 7604); (c) aluminum wire (HTS 7605); (d) aluminum plate, sheet, strip, and foil (flat rolled products) (HTS 7606 and 7607); (e) aluminum tubes and pipes and tube and pipe fitting (HTS 7608 and 7609); and (f) aluminum castings and forgings (HTS 7616.99.51.60 and 7616.99.51.70), including any subsequent revisions to these HTS classifications”;

* the 10% additional duty will apply to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, as of March 23, 2018;

* imports from Canada and Mexico are exempted from the additional duty for now; the proclamation describes the special relationship the United States has with these countries and concludes that aluminum imports from these countries should be exempted, but qualifies it by saying “at least at this time”; this exemption is likely tied to progress with the on-going NAFTA renegotiations and could be taken away by the President with little notice; also, it seems clear that the President means to exempt articles produced in Canada or Mexico, not just articles imported from Canada or Mexico (you cannot ship aluminum produced in China through Canada and avoid the additional U.S. duty);

* imports from countries with which the United States has “a security relationship” (e.g., allies, like the EU, Australia, Japan, Korea, etc.) are encouraged to discuss with the Administration “alternative ways to address the threatened impairment of the national security” presented by imports from their country; this could possibly lead to a series a ‘voluntary-restraint-type’ arrangements being negotiated where exporting countries agree to limit exports to certain levels;

* there will be a petition-based, product exclusion process run by the Department of Commerce (with input from other agencies); the standard for exclusion will be whether the article is (i) produced in the United States “in a sufficient and reasonably available amount or of a satisfactory quality” or (ii) subject to specific national security considerations; petitions need to be filed by “a directly affected party located in the United States” (i.e., foreign suppliers need not apply); Commerce will issue formal procedures for this process by March 18th; 

* the duties will remain in effect until “expressly reduced, modified, or terminated”;

* Commerce will continue to monitor the situation with regard to imports and their impact on the national security and recommend further actions to the President, as needed. 

*     *     *

These additional duties will have a meaningful impact on the market that will go well beyond just producers or importers.  All companies that utilize steel or aluminum in their products are expected to be impacted.  As a result, there are a number of steps all companies should be taking to assess the impact.  For example, supply contracts should be reviewed (even for downstream – e.g., finished products) to determine whether cost increases due to increased customs duties can be passed on or not.  Companies should also be considering whether to apply for a product exclusion.  While the procedures will not come out for several more days, companies should be preparing now (this exclusion process is expected to be similar to that being used in the Section 201 cases, procedurally).  It is not clear whether exclusion will be granted with retroactive effect or not, so it would be best to get your petitions in as early in the process as possible.  We are helping a number of clients with the exclusion process and would be happy to discuss this or other issues related to these duties with you further.

We hope this is helpful.

Best regards,
Ted


It is being reported that the formal announcement regarding the section 232 duties will come as early as Thursday this week.  The reports also contain unclear/conflicting information on whether imports from certain countries could be exempted (the President had previously said that there would be no country-based exceptions, but that now seems to be in flux).  More to follow . . . .


Dear Friends,

Further to the below, it is being widely reported that the President has decided to impose a 25% duty on imported steel and a 10% duty on imported aluminum next week in response to the reports from Commerce.  It is not yet clear whether those additional duties will apply on imports from all countries, or just to imports from a subset of countries.

More to follow on this.  In the meantime, if you have any questions, please let us know.

Best regards,
Ted


Dear Friends,

As you may recall, early last year, President Trump issued two presidential memoranda instructing the U.S. Commerce Department to initiate an investigation into the national security implications of steel imports and aluminum imports into the United States.  If these so-called “section 232” (section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended) investigations determine that steel import and/or aluminum imports “threaten to impair the national security[,]” then the President can impose additional customs duties (among other things) on covered products.

Last Friday, the Secretary of Commerce issued his reports to the President in both matters (available here).   In each case, the Department of Commerce concluded that the quantities and circumstances surrounding steel and aluminum imports “threaten to impair the national security,” thereby opening the door to the imposition of import restraints.  Specifically, Commerce’s recommendations are as follows:

Steel – Alternative Remedies

1.  A global tariff of at least 24% on all steel imports from all countries, or

2.  A tariff of at least 53% on all steel imports from 12 countries (Brazil, China, Costa Rica, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Republic of Korea, Russia, South Africa, Thailand, Turkey and Vietnam) with a quota by product on steel imports from all other countries equal to 100% of their 2017 exports to the United States, or

3.  A quota on all steel products from all countries equal to 63% of each country’s 2017 exports to the United States.

The measures would apply to steel mill products classified in subheadings 7206.10 through 7216.50, 7216.99 through 7301.10, 7302.10, 7302.40 through 7302.90, and 7304.10 through 7306.90.

The goal of such measures is to ensure that U.S. steel producers utilize 80% of production of capacity.

The recommendation also includes a process to allow Commerce to grant requests from U.S. companies for specific product exclusions if there was insufficient domestic production, or for national security considerations.

Aluminum – Alternative Remedies

1.  A tariff of at least 7.7% on all aluminum exports from all countries, or

2.  A tariff of 23.6% on all products from China, Hong Kong, Russia, Venezuela and Vietnam. All the other countries would be subject to quotas equal to 100% of their 2017 exports to the United States, or

3.  A quota on all imports from all countries equal to a maximum of 86.7% of their 2017 exports to the United States.

These measures would apply to unwrought aluminum (heading 7601), aluminum castings and forgings (subheadings 7616.99.51.60 and 7616.99.51.70), aluminum plat, sheet, strip and foil (flat rolled products) (headings 7606 and 7607); aluminum wire (heading 7605); aluminum bars, rods and profiles (heading 7604); aluminum tubes and pipes (heading 7608); and aluminum tube and pipe fittings (heading 7609).

The goal of such measures is to ensure that U.S. aluminum producers utilize 80% of production of capacity.

The recommendation also includes a process to allow Commerce to grant requests from U.S. companies for specific product exclusions if there was insufficient domestic production, or for national security considerations.

The reports and recommendations are now under consideration by the President.  The President is required to make a decision on the recommendations by April 11th (for steel) and by April 19th (for aluminum).

*           *           *

We believe that it is likely that the President will take some action to “adjust imports” based on these reports.  Accordingly, all companies that rely on steel and/or aluminum articles need to evaluate the impact such action may have on their production.  This would apply not only to companies that import covered articles (which will be the articles hit with additional duties and/or quota limitations), but companies that import downstream articles (e.g., parts made of steel or aluminum) as well.  The actions being contemplated are significant enough to have a ripple effect that impacts far more than just the covered products.

If you have any questions about these reports, or what sort of evaluation you should be doing as a result, please let us know.

Best regards,

Ted

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